• Morality

    IDEA OF MORALITY

    The idea of morality is essentially social. It is only meaningful because humans interact with one another in society. By virtue of social interaction, necessitated by the reality of the scarcity of resources, human vulnerability and lack of self-sufficiency, questions about how humans ought to relate in society and who should get what at a given time become very important. It is in an attempt to provide plausible answers to these questions that morality came into being. Morality often refers to the normative code of group of people, that is, the set of principles employed by a people to determine the forms of behavior that are to be accepted as…

  • Morality

    ETHICS AND MORALITY

    The word ‘morality’ and ‘ethics’ are synonymous but different. Some distinguished between the two, others use these terms interchangeably, and sometimes it is used narrowly to mean the moral principles of a particular tradition, group, or individual. However, morality are discussed in ethics –that is, morality is contain in ethics. When we speak of human actions being moral or ethical, we usually mean that they are good actions, and when we speak of human actions being immoral or unethical, we usually mean that they are bad/evil actions. Thus moral and ethical essentially mean good, right likewise, immoral and unethical mean, bad and wrong, often depending upon whether one is referring…

  • Morality

    DOING THE RIGHT THING

    Is it fair for some people to end up living in the streets when others live in mansions? Is it just that some people have to work for over sixty hours a week merely to keep food on the tale while others live in luxury and do not work at all? Inequality on such a scale that it threatens people’s lives does not show appropriate respect (or any respect, some would argue) for the dignity or worth of each person. No one have to watch his or her children go hungry or stay with abusive spouse because there is nowhere to go. It’s just not right! Right are appropriate respect…

  • Morality

    MORAL RELATIVISM: THE PARADOX OF TOLERANCE

    The view that the truth of moral claims is relative to the culture or way of life of those who hold them. It thus generalizes to all of morality what may reasonably be suppose true of matter of etiquette, summed up in the tag ‘when in Rome, do as Romans do’. A mistake sometimes made in moral reasoning is to confuse the two claims: What is believed to be right and wrong may differ from group to group, or culture to culture. What is right and wrong may differ from group to group, society to society, or culture to culture. The second claim, but not the first, is moral relativism.…

  • Morality

    MORALITY AND RELIGION

    For many people, religion is essential to morality. Others find religious morality controversial, or worse. For one thing, religion contributes moral training. For many of us, the only formal moral training we will ever receive is in a religious institution (church, mosque e.t.c.). Many of us fall back on that training, whether we remain religious or not when the going gets tough. Religious leaders are not afraid to speak up for values, in a serious way that goes far beyond the rhetoric of politicians and graduation speakers paying attention to the needs of others; sustaining or rekindling hope in the face of despairs, caring for all creations –these are the…

  • Morality

    CONSISTENCY IN MORAL REASONING

    We sometimes make judgements about one kind of case without thinking a great deal –or thinking at all –about what our judgements imply for similar kinds of cases not before us right now, or in which we play a different role. If we did think about those other cases, we might end up thinking differently about the one before us. This too, in fact, is our responsibility. Like cases must be judge alike! Suppose I am prepared to misrepresent the condition of my Laptop in other to sell it.  Would I consider it equally for someone else to misrepresent his or her phone in the same way and for the…